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Sushi Rice

July 11, 2013

Cook your sushi rice to perfection with our easy to follow, step-by-step recipes. Choose between our basic method, ideal for beginners who nonetheless want to produce their own delicious sushi rice, and our advanced method for those who are looking to make the genuine article.

Basic Method

Ingredients

Sushi should never be made using long grain rice, as it is too dry to shape.

  • 170ml cold water

Quantities may be varied according to the amount of rice required, but the ratio of uncooked rice to water should be one part rice to one and a quarter parts water.

You can make your own sushi rice seasoning by mixing together:

Bring the mirin to the boil to burn off the alcohol and allow to cool. Add the Brown Rice Vinegar.

Method

  1. Wash the rice in a bowl with cold water, handling the grains gently and rinsing frequently until the water runs clear. Soak in 170ml of cold water for 30mins before cooking.
  2. Place the rice and water in a saucepan, bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer with a lid on for 10-12 minutes. Remove and leave to steam for a further 10 minutes.
  3. Use a spatula to remove the rice from the pan and spread over the
    base of a large bowl taking care not to crush the grains. Pour the sushi vinegar mix or the Sushi Rice Seasoning evenly over the rice and make cutting and folding movements with the spatula to mix it well. Do not mash or stir, as you risk crushing the grains.

Advanced Method

Ingredients

Sushi should never be made using long grain rice, as it is too dry to shape.

  • 170ml cold water

Quantities may be varied according to the amount of rice required, but the ratio of uncooked rice to water should be one part rice to one and a quarter parts water.

You can make your own sushi rice seasoning by mixing together:

Bring the mirin to the boil to burn off the alcohol and allow to cool. Add the Brown Rice Vinegar.

Utensils
  • Handai (Wooden bowl)
  • Shamoji (flat wooden scoop)
  • Uchiwa (paper fan)
  • Saucepan with a tight fitting lid

If using a rice cooker, measure the required amount of rice using the measuring cup supplied with the cooker, and use the amount of water indicated on the inside wall of the cooker. If in doubt refer to your cooker’s instruction manual. Follow the instructions below, but at stage 3, place required amount of rice and water, and kombu (dried kelp) if using, in the rice cooker and switch on. When the rice is cooked, leave it in the cooker for 10 minutes without removing the lid. Then return to stage 5 of the instructions below.

Method

  1. First, wash the rice thoroughly by placing it in a bowl, and covering with plenty of fresh, cold water. Mix lightly with your hands, and the starch from the rice will turn the water white.
  2. Drain the water by using your palm as a barrier, and repeat 3-5 times, until the water remains clear. When draining for the final time, a sieve may be used. The rice should then be left for 30 minutes before cooking. This will ensure that the cooked rice is not too soft and sticky, and will absorb the sushi vinegar correctly.
  3. Place the rice and water in a saucepan. A 10cm square of kombu may be added at this stage. This adds depth to the flavour of the rice. Wipe the kombu with a damp cloth before using. Bring to the boil over a medium heat, and remove the kombu, if using, just before boiling point is reached.
  4. When boiling point has been reached, put the lid on the pan, reduce the heat, and simmer for 10 minutes without removing the lid. Remove from the heat, then take off the lid and cover promptly with a tea towel. Put the lid back on, and leave for a further 10 minutes.
  5. Next, use a shamoji to remove the rice from the pan, and place in a wide, shallow container, ideally the traditional Japanese cypress wood rice tub known as a handai. Spread the rice evenly over the bowl using the shamoji, taking care not to crush the kernels.
  6. Add the sushi vinegar promptly, pouring it as evenly as possible over the rice. Using the shamoji, make gentle cutting and folding movements to incorporate the vinegar thoroughly into the rice, being sure not to crush the kernels by mashing or stirring.
  7. At the same time as cutting and folding, fan the rice with a paper fan to ensure it cools down quickly. You may wish to ask someone to help you at this point. It should take about 10 minutes for the rice to have cooled down, by which point all the rice is coated evenly with vinegar.
  8. You should be left with rice that has a beautiful lustre, and does not stick together in lumps or clumps. The sushi rice should be covered with a clean cloth until it is required. It should ideally be used within an hour of preparation, and should never be refrigerated.




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